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Europe Underdeveloped Africa Free Essay

                      UNIVERSITY OF EASTERN AFRICA, BARATON
SCHOOL OF HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY GEOGRAPHY AND DEVELOPMENT STUDIES

A TERM PAPER WRITTEN IN PARITAL FULFILLMENT FOR THE COURSE HIST 411: SELECTED TOPIC IN HISTORY

ASSIGNMENT: THE POLITIC OF UNDERDEVELOPMENT IN AFRICA
            INSTRUCTOR: MR. OMARI PETER.

                            STUDENT’S NAME: KALUNGE JOSPHINE NKATHA

STUDENT’S ID NO: SKALJO1021

Introduction
          Underdevelopment is lack of development in Africa, because every people have developed in one way or another and to a greater or lesser effort. Underdevelopment makes sense only as a means of comparing levels of development.   Underdevelopment is a comparative one. It is possible to compare the economic conditions at two different periods for the same county and determine whether on not it had developed.
A second and even more indispensable component of modern underdevelopment is that it expresses a particular relationship of exploitation namely, the exploitation of one county by another. All of the countries by the capitalist powers named as underdeveloped in the world are exploited by others and the underdevelopment with which the world is now pre-occupied is a product of capitalist, imperialist and colonialist exploitation.
African societies were developing independently unit they were taken over directly or indirectly by the capitalist powers when that happened, exploitation increased and the export of surplus resources and labour. That is an integral part of underdevelopment in the contemporary sense.
        Many of the underdeveloped countries in Africa are called agricultural countries because they rely on agriculture and have little or no industries, but their agriculture is unscientific and the fields are far less than those of developed countries in several of the largest underdeveloped nation there was stagnation and fall in agricultural output in and after 1966.
          In Africa, the...

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Description

Few books have been as influential in understanding African impoverishment as Walter Rodney's classic. Rodney argues that the imperial countries of Europe, subsequently joined by the US, bear major responsibility for impoverishing Africa. They have been joined in this exploitation by agents or unwitting accomplices both in the North and in Africa. This new edition includes additional essays by Rodney and an introduction by the Walter Rodney Foundation, the co-publishers of this officially approved edition, to whom proceeds of the sales of this book will go.
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Product details

  • Paperback | 344 pages
  • 152 x 226 x 22mm | 458.13g
  • 11 Nov 2012
  • Pambazuka Press
  • Oxford, United Kingdom
  • English
  • Revised ed.
  • black & white illustrations
  • 190638794X
  • 9781906387945
  • 103,957